Scientist of Leipzig University Receives the Young Scientist Award of the Saxon Academy of Sciences

Scientist of Leipzig University Receives the Young Scientist Award of the Saxon Academy of Sciences

Gianmaria Falasco receives the Young Scientist Award of the Saxon Academy of Sciences for important contributions to the statistical physics of non-equilibrium.

Gianmaria Falasco, who earned his PhD last year at the Institute for Theoretical Physics of Leipzig University, will receive the Young Scientist Prize of the Saxon Academy of Sciences next Friday (December 14) for his contributions to the statistical physics of non-equilibrium. Increasingly complex systems made up of countless interacting and often unstable components are increasingly shaping the global problems of our time. Their quantitative description and technical control are a challenge that faces numerous scientific disciplines. Gianmaria Falasco has also dealt with this, and the nominating Academy Commission Propagation in Nature, Technology and Society has just published an anthology on interdisciplinary applications of this current field of research.

For phenomena close to thermal equilibrium, physics has developed powerful quantitative methods in the past century, with numerous technological breakthroughs due to it. But their transfer to genuine non-equilibrium systems, such as stock and financial markets, climate change and ecosystems, easily leads to misperceptions, disasters and crises. But how can likely and unlikely scenarios of such complex networked systems be classified and risks assessed? What reliable general predictions can one still make under conditions far from equilibrium that dominate our everyday world? These are undoubtedly pressing fundamental questions of the 21st century. To deal with it intensively, Gianmaria Falasco moved from Padua to Leipzig five years ago.

His investigations led him back to the roots of statistical physics, in particular to Albert Einstein. More than a hundred years ago, he uncovered a surprising connection between the seemingly random movements of microscopic particles in liquids with their molecular structure and temperature — thus leveraging the hitherto controversial atomic hypothesis, which until today provides the foundation for the statistical physics of equilibrium. Falasco wondered how Einstein's insight into situations far from equilibrium could be generalized, where initially no suitable temperature concept exists. The fact that he finally succeeded in finding the relevant generalized temperature and even calculating it exactly for the first time is now honored with the Young Scientist Award of the Saxon Academy of Sciences.

The prize is awarded annually by the friends of the Saxon Academy of Sciences and presented by its chairman, Prof. Dr. Uwe-Frithjof Haustein. The award ceremony will take place on Friday, December 14, 2018, from 4 pm during the Public Autumn Meeting of the Saxon Academy of Sciences at Zeitgeschichtliches Forum Leipzig.

Source:
Translated from the Press Release of Leipzig University

Further Information:
Prof. Dr. Klaus Kroy
Institute for Theoretical Physics
Tel.:+49 (0) 341 97-32 436
Email | Website

Prof. Dr. Jörg Kärger
Saxon Academy of Sciences in Leipzig
Tel.: +49 (0) 341 97-32 502
Email | Website

last modified: 20.12.2018

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