At the Leipzig Institute of Meteorology we use global climate and weather models but also airborne, ground-based observation data as well as satellite data. We use the data to study theprocesses that govern the weather and climate in the troposphere, middle and upper atmosphere.

Radiation sonde at ground in front of the Polarstern during MOSAiC. The sonde was designed for balloon-borne measurements. Photo: Michael Lonardi / Leipzig University
Radiation sonde at ground in front of the Polarstern during MOSAiC. The sonde was designed for balloon-borne measurements. Photo: Michael Lonardi / Leipzig University

Airborne and Ground-Based Observations

We apply spectral and multi-band imaging and non-imaging techniques:

Airborne Observations: Polar aircraft 5 during a maesurement campaign in the arctis. Photo: Tobias Donth
Airborne Observations: Polar aircraft 5 during a maesurement campaign in the arctis. Photo: Tobias Donth

These airborne and ground-based instruments are used to:

  • measure the solar and terrestrial radiation, and
  • to study the effects of clouds and surface propoerties on the atmospheric radiation budget.

We use active remote sensing techniques (cloud radar, rain radar, wind-lidar), and a passive microwave radiometer.

Ground-based remote sensing: LIMHAT and LIMRAD employed at the research ship Meteor during a measurement campaign in the Caribbean in 2020. Photo: Heike Kalesse / University of Leipzig
Ground-based remote sensing: LIMHAT and LIMRAD employed at the research ship Meteor during a measurement campaign in the Caribbean in 2020. Photo: Heike Kalesse / University of Leipzig

Active and passive remote sensing techniques are applied to quantify highly-resolved atmospheric properties of e.g., clouds, precipitation, water vapour, and wind.

The Leipzig institute for meteorology performs climatological observations of the middle atmosphere at the Collm Observatory.

Remote sensing measurments by a VHF meteor radar allow:

  • the quantification of the horizontal wind and temperature in the moesopause region (80 - 100 km altitude), and
  • the observation of meteors and their properties.

Measured datas

Climatological observations: VHF meteor radar at Collm Observatory measuring horizontal wind and temperature. Photo: Christoph Jacobi / University of Leipzig
Climatological observations: VHF meteor radar at Collm Observatory measuring horizontal wind and temperature. Photo: Christoph Jacobi / University of Leipzig

Satellite-Based Observations

To study global atmospheric linkages we use data of:

  • geostationary, and
  • polar-orbiting satellite observations.

Based on these measurements, remote sensing products are derived which characterize aerosol and cloud properties.

For example, state-of-the-art retrievals of concentrations of cloud condensation nuclei and ice nucleating particles were developed.

Climate Models

We work with different climate and weather models

  • to describe cloud and aerosol processes in the troposhere, and
  • to analyze the dynamics of the middle and upper atmosphere.

For that purpose, we use computational capacity at our institute, but also at the German Climate Computing Center (DKRZ).

You may also like

Our Research

Read more

Academic Career

Read more

Publications

Read more